Category Archives: tutorials

Milk Jug Spider

I love making Halloween decorations! I also love to make CHEAP decorations. I don’t think I can find a good reason to buy a lot of what I see in the stores. 1. Because I want my kids to grow up knowing that they can build things, grow their own food and be creators instead of just consumers and 2. I hate spending money on junk from China that’s most likely built in sweat shops. I am pretty happy with a lot of what I can make, too. 

I live in South Texas. Halloween celebrations are almost as big as high school football down here. I have seen some amazing stuff (and I’m a little competitive, craft-wise!) and we have learned to really get into and appreciate Halloween. A couple of years ago I made some packing tape ghosts. Last year I made a dead body and some ghosts with styrofoam heads covered with cheesecloth. This year I’m focusing on spiders, grave stones and witch circles. It’s a good thing we have a big front yard!

Here are my directions and some tips for making $5 spiders out of duct tape, a one gallon milk jug and foam pipe:

First you need to go to your local hardware store and pick up a couple of things. One is black duct tape. You’ll find it in the paint area with all of the other tapes. Second you need to head over to the plumbing section and get some foam insulation tubing. The tubing comes in 6 foot sections and I got the cheapest, which were about 97 cents a piece. You will need 4 of the six foot lengths for each spider.

Once you have these two ingredients for your spider, you’ll need: a clean,  dry, empty milk jug

some fairly sharp scissors and a paint pen (in a color other than black.) 

First you need to find the center of the tubing. Bend a tube in half and mark where the middle is with a paint pen. Straighten the marked pipe out again. 

Place the four pieces of tubing where the ends are lined up equally. Now is when I used my assistant to help me hold the tubing straight. Tape across the marked area. You only need to have one tube marked for this. 

There’s the middle!

Next you need to tape off the milk jug. You could randomly tape across this, but your milk jug is almost square, I suggest horizontal lines. Cover all but the handle corner.

Wrap all but the back corner panels of the jug (the area by the handle.) You can wrap the whole thing in tape if you like, but the legs will cover the back of the 90° angle, so you don’t need to. 

Cut the lid area off.

Don’t tape over the hole just yet. You will probably need to blow into the jug to puff out the sides that will collapse a little as you tape. 

Next cut U shaped cuts across the centered part you taped.

Line your cut marks along the handle of the milk jug. 

Now tape the legs to the body where the center of the legs is in a V shape and the feet are at an angle away from the floor. You don’t need to be too perfect, but leave area to adjust the legs with tape. 

Spider upside-down. 

Now bend one leg in half to mark where you want the leg joint. It should be about 1/2 of the length of the leg. Mark that fold with paint pen. Continue with all 8 legs. Remember to approximately match the legs on the opposite side. 

With the spider upside down: cut the joints like you did the center of the legs, except instead of a U, make a V. Remember the angle you cut should be at the same point in each leg to keep the legs angled correctly. 

Now it’s time to tape each leg joint. I found it really helpful to do this while the spider was upright on the ground. If you do it on your lap the legs will end up wonky and you’ll probably have to redo them. Luckily this is just tape and foam so you can fix things by just retaping or adding a new piece of tape somewhere. If you have too many layers down you can get around that mistake by cutting the joint back open and taping again. 

You can get an idea of what the legs will look like finished: while the spider rests on the floor. 

If you ended up with crooked legs: this is where you fix them. Tape a small circle around the base of the leg. Hold the leg like you want it and then tape it that way. I ended up with a lot of waste during this part because I kept getting the sticky sides stuck together in tight spaces. This is the only frustrating part of the project. Remember that the tape might not permanently adhere to the foam but it will definitely adhere to itself! 

Holding, twisting and taping. I have found that you should over correct to get the legs to stay in the right place. 

Now go back and tape over any exposed undersides of the tape. Use small strips. It’s extra work but it’s worth it! Angles should already be the way you want them. This is just to fill out the body and cover exposed edges. It also takes it from milk jug looking mess to spider! 

I hope you enjoyed this! Keep tuned in for other cheap Halloween projects! 

Will They Ripen? 

We live a little east of San Antonio. When hurricane Harvey’s winds were just a few hours out, I had a choice: bring in severely under ripe, astringent, Asian persimmons (and super green tomatoes) or risk breaking the brittle branches that were loaded with fruit and have the fruit split from the deluge.

Several days after harvest. Some were coloring up but others just sat there green and hard.

(Mine happen to be the Saijo variety. If you can get past the runny texture: these are the most insanely sweet, most flavorful fruit I can grow here. However the “snot” like texture can be off-putting and I dislike them cooked. They end up like cooked pumpkin, but not as good as real pumpkin. These are all things to consider when planting astringent Asian persimmons.)

Harvey’s constant winds drove rainwater under our front door. We ended up putting plastic under the door and taping it closed, with painter’s tape, from the outside.

I always pull my persimmon slightly early: just when they start to color, otherwise I lose them to birds and squirrels. The variety I have ripen over a long period of time, so I don’t usually have a glut and can enjoy a long harvest. However. When you are preparing for a hurricane (my husband and I met because of Katrina, so this wasn’t our first rodeo.) you have to consider fruit weight, high winds and the strength of the wood.

Saijo fruits developing.

My Saijo is a heavy fruiter. It is a reliable tree that I can always expect a good year from. This year was no different. My pear had 1 pear this year. My peach (that was a gift from my non-gardening husband) as usual, had nothing, but my persimmon was loaded down with fruit. Very green. Astringent. Super un-ripe fruit. I really didn’t have a choice. The fruit had to come down.

Last year’s harvest. This tree is a hard worker in my garden!

This is half of what I pulled, plus my large harvest of super green tomatoes. Both of these are fruit that will ripen off the plants, but usually: I only pull these after they start to color. So, it was a “wait and see” type of thing.

Half of the persimmons I pulled.

I was not very hopeful with these tomatoes. But I had to pull them or I’d have lost all of them.

As the persimmon sat out on the counter I eventually noticed that they were getting soft and gelatinous (like ripe persimmon would) but the fruit’s skin was still green. I was thinking: I was going to have to throw them out. Before I trashed all of my fruit I decided to cut one of the soft ones open and check if there was any reason to keep them. To my surprise: despite the green skin, they were fully ripe inside and not astringent at all.

Soft, but still green on the outside.

What my fruit color should look like, beside the green skinned, but soft, fruit.

Inside of the green skinned fruit. It is ripe, non astringent and the correct color.

Ripe on the inside saijo. It was just as delicious as it is every year!

I am so happy these did not have to be thrown out! My tomatoes went from solid green (most had no blush at all) to fully ripe also.

Very unripe tomatoes.

We were also extremely lucky that the hurricane did not do as much damage here as weather casters and our city expected. We got enough winds that they blew down three sections of our privacy fence, but no lasting damage.

One of the sections of fence we lost during Harvey.

Because none of my trees had a fruit load: I didn’t lose any branches. Like I said: San Antonio was very, very lucky! Our prayers are with our Houston neighbors, who were not as fortunate.

Most of those super green tomatoes ripened too.

So if you have a reason you MUST harvest persimmon and tomatoes early: know that for the most part, you will end up with ripe fruit. It’s OK to harvest very early, IF you have no other options. I can say that I wouldn’t do this if I had an option to leave them on the tree (I’ve noticed these persimmons can be slightly harder to digest when they weren’t ripened a bit more on the tree.) but if we have another emergency early harvest, I will be much more relaxed about the outcome!

 

LED shoe port cover

So, this is another post where I couldn’t find any advice on my specific problem and thought I’d share the solution I came up with.

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LED shoes are super popular right now. They have a switch inside the shoe to change the light pattern and the colors. That button is usually along the cord, right under the USB port (where you charge the shoe). The main problem is the placement of the port/switch. If it’s inside the shoe (like all three pairs my kids have) it will rub your child’s ankle making the shoe uncomfortable and possibly creating blisters where it rubs.

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We figured out pretty quickly that the port was going to be a problem. My kids wore them on meet the teacher night and were complaining as soon as we got out of the car. My youngest wanted to take his shoes off by the time we got into the school. So sending either of them to a full school day in their super cool new shoes was not looking likely.

I considered gluing one side of the tongue of the shoe, over the port, but I figured the tongue would probably tear. Then I thought I might just hot glue over the port but I’ve used hot glue enough to know that making it perfectly flat (so that it wouldn’t irritate my kid’s feet) was probably not possible. So I settled on the idea of creating a padded pocket for the port.wp-image-1585711791

(You can see the area of the sock I used above.)

I looked over our errant sock collection and decided to use the thickest one I could find. I found an old Merrell sock. It’s probably the thickest sock I’ve ever owned so it was what I chose. I suggest using a sock that is like a sports sock (I’m thinking of soccer socks) because: they are made to stop rubbing in the shoe, over an extended period of running.

I also decided to use the top of the sock. Because this was an ankle length sock: I had more of the finished edge than a tube sock would have. I had enough from my one sock to repair two sets of shoes.

Here is what you will need:
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A very thick sock/s (amounts will be different depending on how many shoes you are repairing and how the sock is made. Plan for about a 2×2 inch square per port patch.)

Sharp scissors

A mini hot glue gun (I suggest the mini because you will have more control over the amount of glue that comes out. I’m sure you can use a standard sized glue gun, if you believe you can work with it.)

The process:

Look at your sock. You need the finished edge for this so that it doesn’t unravel at the top of the pocket.

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Next look at the port. Half of it should fit inside the lining of the shoe. Make sure it is pulled back into the area it’s supposed to be inside of. If it’s not: try and work it back into the hole for the cord.

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Next lay the edge of your sock over the port. You are going to need to use a large patch so that it keeps itself where you’ve placed it even while your kids are at recess (or if they’re yours: wherever you are gonna rock your super awesome flashy shoes). A small patch will more than likely rub free and then you’ll need to start over.

I cut about a 1 3/4in wide x 2in long piece of the sock. This is where you are going to need to eyeball it. It should come along the upper edge of the shoe and down onto the inner side of it (but NOT onto the bottom, inner sole of the shoe.) Your switch and port should be completely covered by the patch.

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Next: it’s time for the hot glue. You don’t need much: a big lump of cooled hot glue could be just as uncomfortable as the port. You also need to leave the top unglued so that you can still charge the shoes. I glued around the sides of the port keeping the top of the sock next to the sewn side of the shoe. Next I raised the loose bottom of the patch and glued the three remaining sides that weren’t secured. I then flattened them from the top sides to the bottom of each patch. Your patch should not have any of the port exposed.

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I also poked the tip of the gun inside the top loop of the finished edge of the sock and secured it.

All that is left is to check that you can still access the port AND have your kids (or you!) wear the shoes around the house for an hour or so and see if your patch is sufficient to make the shoes comfortable.

Hopefully you used a thick enough sock that the shoe’s ports are no longer painful. This worked for the shoes I patched. My kids say they are much more comfortable. I’m still going to send a different pair with them in their backpacks, just in case some part of this patching fails. I will also check the shoes regularly to make sure no part of the patch has broken free.

I’m glad we could find a way to make these super cool shoes school ready. If you do this: let me know how it worked out in the comments below. And if you post your fix: as a courtesy, please link back to this page!

 

Last Minute Christmas Gift

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Want to know what I made at the last minute this year? Fun winter themed footprints from my kids! If you are searching for something you can complete quickly: the shirts/sweatshirts need time to dry in between layers but it won’t take too long if you follow my  directions.

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I chose a winter theme (rather than Christmas) because if you gift these to grandma and grandpa: they can wear these outside of the Christmas season! Also, if these arrive late: who cares!? Grandma and grandpa will still love them and be able to wear them until it gets warm out. If your Christmas season is during the warm months (those of you South of the equator) you can give these during the colder months of your year.

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You need:

Sweatshirt/s Or T-shirt/s (in the correct size/s for the recipient and pre-launder them so you remove the chemicals that come on new clothing.)

Plain Old Acrylic Craft Paint (you do not need special fabric or additives and those would have longer drying times. Let your recipients know that they should wash these on delicate to keep the paint it’s freshest looking. Although, these should stand up to regular washing.) I used: brown, green, red, black and white

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Craft Paint Brushes (You really only need: one large brush to fill areas and one small brush for edges and details)

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Chalk (I used my kids sidewalk chalk, but thinner chalk or chalk made for marking fabric would work better.)

A Pencil Or Washable Marker

A Plate For Paint (with some cling wrap to keep the paint fresh between layers)

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Paper Towels: for clean up on mistakes, chalk removal and to moisten the fabric before you paint details. (The only paint I had trouble with on damp shirts was red because it bled. I would recommend wetting the shirt/sweatshirts for all other colors)

Cardboard: to keep foot prints off the floor and to test your first prints

A Way To Clean Up! A bathtub full of warm water for older kids or warm water on paper towels to clean paint off of a baby’s foot.

Time To Do This (Mine took two days to complete with the drying times included.)

 

Instructions:

Get out your supplies. Put on the shirt or sweatshirt (if these are too small for you to wear hold them up against your shoulders so they drape like you are wearing them.) Go in front of a mirror and use the chalk to make a large square where you would like the footprints to be. Make sure your bottom line is straight and that you have left room for whatever labels and names you want to add below the feet.

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Grab your kids and go in the bathroom! This is really messy while your kids are involved! Choose the foot you want to use (or if you are using both of one child’s feet start with one foot first.) Paint your kiddo’s foot with black craft paint and test stamp it on the cardboard. Once you’ve figured out how much paint you need for a good stamp CAREFULLY stamp your kids foot on the shirt with their toes at the bottom line. (If you are dealing with a baby put some cardboard inside the shirt so you can stamp sideways while the baby lays on it’s back. Wait until they are sleeping heavily to do this or they will wiggle their toes. You may only have one shot at this per nap.) Make sure you have room to either hang these out of the way immediately or have a place you are able to put them flat to dry!

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Once you get a stamp: quickly wash your kids foot off or they will put black paint everywhere! It doesn’t have to be perfect because you will be filling it in with more paint in a moment. Get all of prints that you want to use. (For a large family this could take some patience!) If you really mess this up and need to start over: carefully wipe off as much paint as you can and scrub, then wash the shirt well.

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Once you and your kids are cleaned up take the shirt in on a clean hard surface and fill the footprints in until they are solid. It is easier to push the paint towards a line than pull it across the fabric. A moist surface accepts paint better than a dry one will.

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Let the foot prints dry completely.

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Draw in your details on the foot print with a pencil or chalk.

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Draw in your labels or names with a washable marker or chalk (pencil doesn’t work well directly on fabric.)

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Paint your large white front on the penguins, add wings in black, paint in the names and paint the background colors on any details you want to add.

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Let dry.

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Finish painting details. Let dry. Use your wet paper towels to remove the chalk markings and any mistakes you make as you are going (the paint is really hard to completely remove so try not to make any big changes.)

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Get ready to impress your gift recipient! We mailed ours to the grandparents but if you are going to see them this Christmas: you still have time to finish these!

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Have fun, try not to completely stress out and if you post your work online please remember where you got your instructions and link back to this page! Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

 

Winter: Garden Planning

Winter is a wonderful time to read up on gardening literature. When your garden is fast asleep, it is the perfect time to make preparations for next year. Whether you are new to gardening or an old hand: this is the yearly time for reflection. What has worked for you? What have you struggled with? What are you sure of? What would you like to learn about?

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Follow along and learn how to create a long lasting, low maintenance gardening experience. There’s a lot of practical knowledge in here that I would love to share with you! Below is a list of articles by category. You can quickly find solutions to past problems or plan your garden design to avoid those problems altogether.

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My instructions are heavy on preparation, but they create gardening solutions that will last for decades.

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Does it seem like you are spending $20 for each tomato you grow? If you are struggling to get anything from your garden the problem could be your soil. Raised beds are a great way to create the perfect conditions for vegetables. Unfortunately, a lot of instructions out there look nice: but they are ideas from novice gardeners. Frequently the beds are too shallow, too expensive or built from materials that will quickly rot. Building raised beds is a lot of work and I don’t want to have to redo everything in a couple of years. I doubt you want to start over every couple of years, either. Here is my solution involving a sheet mulch, hugelkulter and keyhole bed combination with cinder block walls. This is the cheapest, most fertile, longest lasting solution I could come up with and it works beautifully: Mother’s Day Raised Hugelkultur Bed and a second article here: Hugelkultur, Keyhole Gardens: Bridging Ideas

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If you need help choosing products to either amend soil or to build raised beds: these are my picks for choosing bagged soil and soil additives and also my choices and suggestions for building your own soil with cheap sheet mulching supply ideas. Making sense of old sayings

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Once you’ve created good planting conditions your next step is efficient watering. This will help you whether you are in an arid area or just need to save on your watering bill: Efficient Summer Watering In A Raised Bed

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Are you struggling with pollinators? If you aren’t getting abundant squash, melons, cucumbers and other veggies in the cucurbit family you may just need more bees. While you are waiting for your newly planted flowers to attract pollinators this year, here is what you can do: Be The Bee! How And When Hand Pollinating Makes Sense This also explains how to help plants that are wind and self-pollinators.

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If you are brand new to gardening or if you are really struggling overall: this is my “all in one stop” to learn your way around common mistakes. You must know the subjects in orange and you can add the rest as you get more success under your belt: All You Need To Know To Grow The same information is also at the top of this page under Gardening Basics

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If you are struggling with clearing Bermuda grass and are impatient to have finished beds I suggest this approach: Beds Over Bermuda grass Or: Landscape Fabric Sandwich

Inexpensive Vine Support

Inexpensive Vine Support

If you would like to try to train your vining plants on a cheap support next season: this is a fast, inexpensive and strong solution- Simple, Inexpensive Vine Support

Seed Starting: Tips and Tricks

Seed Starting: Tips and Tricks

My tips for starting seeds in milk jugs and my recommendations for mail order seed and live plant companies: The Seed Collector’s Insanity (Tips And Tricks For Starting Your Seeds)

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If you dislike the hardening off process (getting your seedlings ready to plant out in the garden) like I do, here is a short cut: Short Cut Through The Hardening-Off Process

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If you would like to see what other people have been interested in on here, this is Crazy Green Thumb’s most read article. I don’t advocate using gravel in the landscape and this is why: Please Don’t Rock Your Yard!

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If you are longing for a fun craft project for this winter, here are a few ideas. These are the projects I have enjoyed creating this year:

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Melted Perler Bead and Pony Bead Craft Projects

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Last Minute Kid Friendly Halloween Decorations

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Come On, You Know You Want To! Recycled Glass Flowers In The Garden

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Solution For Sore Shoulders: Microwavable Rice Sock

Want some new ideas for using plants that you may already enjoy growing? Here are some of my favorite recipes from this year. These are my own recipes. They may make you interested in adding a few of these plants to your plans:

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Ever Had Spiced Hibiscus Flower Tea?

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Cooking With Lettuce?!?! Yes! And It’s Delicious!!!

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Garden Huckleberry: A Completely Nutty Science Experiment!!!

I love my short winter down time! I get to look at my successes and challenges, plan my garden for next year and organize and choose the seeds I want to grow. I hope you have a productive winter planning your garden! Here in the Northern Hemisphere our season is at an end. If you’re on the Southern part of the globe: Happy Spring/Summer!!!

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See you all in the garden next year!!!!

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Melted Perler Bead and Pony Bead Craft Projects

Every once in a while I end up on Pinterest. I don’t do it often because it’s like going to an all you can eat buffet: I think I can eat (or do) way more than reality will allow me to. On one of my visits to Pinterest I saw some melted pony bead crafts and I thought it would be fun to do them with my kids.

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These are pony beads. If you want a stained glass look: make sure you use translucent beads.

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I bought two big bags of pony beads and then separated them by color and put them into sandwich bags.

I also like a challenge and since I saw a pony bead version of Van Gogh’s Starry Night on Pinterest I figured I could do that as my grown-up craft. You can find it here: http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=101446.0

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Van Gogh’s Starry Night.

So, now I am going to come out of the closet and admit to being a Doctor Who fan. (This seems like a random admission at this point, but keep reading.) I love BBC programing and I have since I was a kid. I would hand tune my TV dial to PBS and watch everything BBC as often as I could. It definitely affected my sense of humor! To celebrate my inner nerd (Who am I kidding? I’m all nerd!) I did a bunch of Doctor Who themed crafts for the season premier, this being one of them.

I saw the original starry night pony bead sun-catcher and I said to myself: this just needs a TARDIS (Doctor Who reference) and it would be perfect! (I had seen a starry night painting online with the TARDIS in it before. It’s here: http://stuffpoint.com/doctor-who/image/36814-doctor-who-starry-night-with-tardis.jpg ) I also thought there had to be a way to make the pony bead version look more interesting (the colors in the original were very plain in the sunlight). I also wanted to have better control of the dark areas: I decided I’d use Perler beads there.

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These are Perler beads. Perler is a brand of beads . They are usually sold to be used in a preset pegged design and then fused together by passing an iron over it. These are sold in craft and hobby stores.

You certainly don’t need to watch (or care) about BBC programming to enjoy this craft. I also made a tic tac toe board using the same technique (The tic tac toe board was my son’s idea and it was a good one!). I used a combination of Pony and Perler beads for the Starry Night project. I only used pony beads for the board. Doing a large project like the Starry Night one isn’t too difficult but it takes a long time to finish. You may want to start with something smaller like the tic tac toe board or a small sun-catcher to get a feel for the melting times. I assembled my bead version of “Starry Night” over two days. You have to be very careful not to bump it or tip it or you may have to start over!

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We used parchment paper for the board but you don’t have to. Although, it made it easy to line the beads up in a grid.

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This is the tic tac “bow” board we made, prior to melting it.

The reason I am exposing my nerdy tendencies is this: as I was doing the Van Gogh craft I wanted to use Perler beads for detail and translucent pony beads for the sun-catcher part. I could NOT find anything that had information about melting Perler beads or if you could use them with pony beads. This was my first bead melting project and I had no instructions. I’m a firm believer in the “go big or go home” way of living. (You can refer to my past gardening entries for verification of this.) I spent two days assembling the beads and I had no idea if they would work.

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Perlers and pony beads. DO NOT try it this way!

They didn’t, and they failed in a different way than I thought they would. My husband and I were able to pry them out and in the process we broke the whole thing. Luckily this project is just melted beads so I was able to save this by fixing the problem with the Perler beads and remelting the whole thing.

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So, Yes! You can melt Perler beads and pony beads and any combination of the two, you just need to follow these directions:

There are many melted pony bead sun-catcher instructions online. All you need to be successful melting pony beads is a non-stick cookie sheet and an outdoor gas grill so you don’t have to deal with the fumes. (This will forever ruin the non-stick cookie sheet or non-stick cupcake tin. Make sure you put them in with your crafting supplies when you are done rather than trying to cook on them again. If you don’t have a non-stick pan you are willing to ruin: visit your local thrift shop and pick one up. You can also do this in an oven. I don’t recommend it because the fumes are horrible.) After you melt the pony beads: they cool and shrink and will automatically release from the non-stick surface. Just wait for them to cool and lift it out. EASY!

Perler beads are a different animal. Perler beads look like they are made of vinyl. I figured they would melt first and maybe run under the pony beads and make a huge mess. They did make a huge mess, but not in the way I imagined. The Perler beads melted last and I didn’t leave them in our gas grill long enough to melt out the holes in the middle of them. I imagine if I left them in a bit longer I would have had a smoother end product but this was when I was dealing with the difference in the beads. I came very close to giving up. The Perler beads fused to the nonstick cookie sheet. I ended up having my husband force them out with a hard spatula. He had to break the whole thing to get the Perler area out.

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I was afraid I had wasted two days of my life on this dumb sun-catcher project. So, I started going through pages and pages of obscure blog posts trying to find the answer to the Perler problem. I did find an answer: parchment paper. Here’s where I found it: http://rebekahgough.blogspot.com/2012/12/perler-bead-oven-ornaments.html

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If you line your cookie sheet with parchment paper the Perler beads will not stick. But would the pony beads work with my solution? Yes. They did.

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The very nearly ruined first attempt.

The problem then became how could I melt these in the gas grill and not catch the parchment paper on fire? I ended up deciding not to chance it and remelted the broken pieces on parchment paper in our oven. It stunk up the whole house with a sickening plastic smell! That is why Fall (or Spring) is a great time to do this. You can open up your house and air it out! I did mine in +100 F degree summer weather and I still HAD to open the house up to get the plastic smell out. Not good for our air-conditioning bill…live and learn! I wish I had had a big enough toaster oven to do this outside which would avoid the chance of catching the paper on fire. I think the paper might work at a very low temperature for a longer amount of time in a gas grill.

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I’ve made a few things with melted beads and I would only use Perler beads if I wanted the effect I got in the Van Gogh project. The pony beads are much easier to work with! Either way: this is a fun and satisfying project!

Instructions:

First decide which beads you want to work with. For pony beads you just need a non-stick cookie sheet (Use a sheet with sides! I wouldn’t try this if you are making something large on a completely flat sheet.) For Perler beads, or for a combination of the two, you will need to line the cookie sheet with parchment paper.

The pony beads don’t ooze much so you don’t need much paper outside of the pony beads design. Perler beads ooze more so: you will need more paper or run paper up the side of the tray for them. Put the parchment paper down and fold the area by the sides so that it is creased enough to follow the  of the edge of your sheet.

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Decide on your design. Mine was loosely based on Van Gogh’s Starry Night. I printed out and put a grid on my inspiration piece so that I would have an easier time lining things up in the right proportions. The more I worked on it the more it became my own idea and less of what I’d seen.

Remember this is a bead project. If you keep these two rules in mind this will be a much less stressful project: 1. You won’t get a lot of detail with little circles that melt down to a hexagon shape. 2. You will not get straight lines with a large picture like this. For a very large project it is necessary to pack the beads tightly to keep the design from moving. That means the beads will be in a zigzag pattern as you push them close together. Try and remember that as you pick out your design. It is one reason that the Van Gogh painting works with this: few straight lines. Anything with strong lines or great detail will be hard to duplicate.

I marked on the parchment paper with a pencil to get the lines straight on the tic tac toe board (Or: “tic tac bow” as we call ours. It looked too much like a present to not add a bow!) I was able to create straight lines with this one because the pattern was much smaller. It took a long time to get straight and then the slightest bump made the lines wonky. Also, the pencil transferred to the melted beads so you might want to try a pen or marker.

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Some pony beads don’t melt as fast as others. The red ones that I had that did not have glitter in them stayed lumpy even though the glittery ones melted flat. I would guess if you wanted to have them both flat it would just take a little longer in the grill. I kind of enjoy the lumps. I used two kinds of beads because I didn’t have enough of one kind for the project.

Arrange your design. Work until you are happy. I didn’t have enough beads for the Van Gogh project to use the colors I wanted. I wish now that I had just bought more beads. You can’t change your design once they are fused. This takes a long time to get right and you might as well invest in the color beads you will be most happy with. I also wanted more colors than the one I saw online. Unfortunately, the beads looked very different before I melted them than they did afterwards.

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Before

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A very different “after” look.

I really liked my color choices before I melted them. After I melted them I wished I had used slightly different colors and gone ahead and bought more beads…but they aren’t cheap so I doubt I will redo this. Plus: it was a fun Doctor Who themed craft. It’s not like it was going to hang in a museum!

Set your gas grill burners on low or set your oven to 400 degrees F. Carefully place your cookie sheet in your heat source. Wait 5 minutes and check it. These will continue to flatten out. If you want it as smooth as glass it may take 30 minutes or more. The longer you melt, the fewer bubbles will be trapped and the clearer the design will be. Heating times will vary depending on the look you want and (unfortunately) the type and brand of plastic pony beads you use (which makes the melting time kind of random.) Mine melted really fast on the grill. Slower in the oven. Your project most likely won’t be done after five minutes, but you need to keep an eye on this. I have read some people have caught them on fire in their grills. (I would guess they left them in way too long, had the heat too high, were using charcoal or did something else that aren’t in these directions.) Check on your beads every 5 minutes. Opening the oven or gas grill often will allow the bead fumes to vent. Again, I wouldn’t do this inside if you don’t have to: but you can.

Once your beads are fused and as flat as you would like them, carefully remove them from your heat source and allow them to cool. Put them outside to cool! Since cooling can be done outside and they are still creating fumes: remove them from your home if you had them in your oven! Wait until it’s cool to the touch. If you used pony beads they will have automatically pulled away from the non-stick surface as they shrink and cool. Lift it out and admire your handiwork!

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If you used Perler beads: allow your project to cool. They should not have touched anything other than the parchment paper. If that is the case: lift it out and admire your handiwork! If they touched the cookie sheet: Pry it off. If it breaks, put parchment paper along the whole surface (you’ll know exactly where it didn’t have parchment, it’s okay, you can fix this!) and carefully align the broken area/s. Remelt. Allow to cool and admire your handiwork!

Finishing:

I have a bunch of different colored magic markers. I added details using the magic markers. You can easily remove the magic marker marks from the pony beads with a pencil eraser. This way, you are not stuck with just the way the beads melt. I wanted to see a little more movement in it so I added swirls to it. I know from experience magic marker will not last outdoors. If you like what your design looks like with magic marker make sure you hang it inside.

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For anything you would like to hang (versus just sitting it in a window, which is what I did): use a small diameter drill bit and drill a couple of holes and hang (If you break it, you can always remelt!) These end up pretty fragile so be careful. For the tic tac toe (tic tac bow) board: use dry erase markers to play. I’ve only done these projects with the above directions. I don’t know what else would work, but that’s the fun part: experimenting! I’d love to see any projects you come up with using these directions!!!

Please remember where you got your instructions! If you use these directions and post your own project please be kind enough to link back to this page. Thanks! Have fun!

Here are the other projects I tried out for the Doctor Who season 8 premier:

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I tried painting some $5 shoes I picked up at Walmart. I will definitely do more like this. Sonic screwdriver

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A weeping angel and the eleventh doctor with a mop, a bow tie and a fez. You can scream “NERD!” at me now. I’ll roll with it.

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A crack in the Universe and my obligatory glitter. Yes, I am only twelve years old in my mind! I figure I should never grow up: It’s bad for my imagination!

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Goofy, Doctor Who themed nails. WAYYY to much work. I will not be trying to do this much detail on my fingers again (especially since I was using toothpick tips to paint the details!) I have a lot of respect for the people who post nail art. I will have to admire their work from a distance from now on!

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Come On, You Know You Want To! Recycled Glass Flowers In The Garden

It’s hot out right now. Like: “melt into a puddle with whatever remaining liquid is left in your poor dehydrated body” hot out. San Antonio has a long growing season: 280 days. Our summers are included in the 280 days but I’m not sure that’s very fair. I can get peppers, okra and eggplants through our summer but but I need to water each plant every other day. Although I enjoy having these veggies I don’t want to be out in the yard in 100+ degree days sweating myself into a puddle if I don’t have to. So to celebrate and beautify my garden (without actually being out in the heat gardening) I have a great project: glass garden flowers!!!!

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Okay, I know glass and the great outdoors don’t seem like a good match but they can be. I’m going to teach you how to add a little recycled glass glamor to your yard. These are the stand-ins in my garden before my flowers take off in the spring and they are pretty enough to command attention even though they are located within one of my big patches of beautiful zinnias.

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I have seen drilled glass flowers. I am too lazy to deal with that. Mine are glued. I like mine glued. Very fast, very simple, plus: I used very heavy glass serving dishes, not thin porcelain plates like most people do. Glue is the way to go!

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There were a few things I learned from reading online and the rest I did from a few attempts on my own. I’ve seen bell hangers used for glass flowers. Since that seemed to be what the majority of online posts have used I figured I’d go ahead and rely on their experience. The only bell hangers I have found are at Lowe’s in the plumbing department. (Don’t bother with Home Depot. They don’t carry them. However, you can certainly try other hardware stores in your area.) If you don’t have a Lowe’s near you can find them online. They aren’t cheap but they work.

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These are bell hangers. They come in different sizes for different diameter pipes. Make sure you have all of your supplies matched up before you check out. Go ahead and remove the screws. You won’t need them if you are gluing.

I thought about using something other than bell hangers, but I was already at the store and wasn’t interested in wandering the isles coming up with my own idea. The main issue I have with the bell hangers is that they only have a thin circular rim to attach to the plate. Something flat would probably work better, giving the glue more area to adhere to between the plate and the attachment piece. In the absence of my own brilliant answer to this shortcoming: I will admit from my own experience the bell hangers do work. I bought a contractor pack because I plan to make a bunch of these.

Here’s a link for the pricing: http://www.lowes.com/Search=bell+hangers?storeId=10151&langId=-1&catalogId=10051&N=0&newSearch=true&Ntt=bell+hangers#!

While you’re at the hardware store in the plumbing department (near where you pick up the bell hangers) will be the area for pvc pipe. Match up the pvc so that it will fit inside the ring that is attached to the bell hanger (The bell hangers come in different sizes to accommodate different sized pipe.)

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Looking for rebar? You are in the right section of the hardware store if it looks like this. Those boxes on the shelves are full of rebar. Pick something thick and long. Get the same number of rebar as you have plans to make finished glass flowers.

You will use the rebar to run into the ground as the base/support and you will place the pvc pipe over it.

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You will also need some epoxy gorilla glue. I have no idea if anything else will work. This is the only glue I have used for this project.

The other thing you can use to decorate your flowers are glass beads or stones from a craft store.

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These are in the floral section of hobby/craft stores. Hold them up to the lights in the store. If they are too dark: pass them up. If they shimmer beautifully in the light, head to the checkout! I was sure the dark red would look nice in the sunlight. They were too dark and not evenly colored. I went with a bag of blue and a bag of green.

I have used high heat clear “window, door, trim and siding” silicone glue (the high heat designation will be listed on the side in the fine print) to put them on and also gorilla glue.

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They both work for this application. The silicone glue is much messier and will require gloves. You will also need mineral spirits to clean up the silicone glue. I recommend sticking to epoxy for the whole project.

We got a box of medical gloves from our pediatrician and I’m hooked! I use them to protect my hands during any messy chore/craft and this project was no different. They’re really handy to have around and you can bet I’ll be ordering another box when this one runs out!

Find some pretty plates you’d like to use to make your flowers. My antique plates are not things I would choose to ruin for this crafting project, so I hit the local Goodwill to find some cheap alternatives. This is what I picked out:

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Two very decorative pressed glass plates that created a really cool effect when put together.

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This is a great use for all of those pretty stamped glass plates your great grandmother would have collected. Fortunately, if you can’t bring yourself to mess up your own antique plates there are always a bunch of them at thrift shops! Look for lighter weight plates if you want to do several layers. (I did have a failure. Don’t use frosted glass on a side you will glue. It looked horrible. The lopsided glued area was clear and the rest was frosted. I’m still trying to find a solution for that one.) If you just want one plate with glass stones glued to them like the ones above and below, know that those glass stones will add quite a bit of weight on their own. I think the stones look better on the back of the plate rather than the front. You also should thoroughly wash your plates before starting to remove any film or dirt that will affect the adhesive. I ran mine though our dishwasher which uses a separate spotting/rinse agent in it.

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This was very heavy with the thickness of the plate and the glue, glass beads and the bell ring. It is not the one that dropped. I think if you use a textured plate: try and use the flat side for the bell ring attachment point. I believe the ridges in the other set of plates is why that flower dropped. I just went back and doubled the glue to fix it. All three flowers are still holding.

If you really like the look of something heavy, you may still be able to use it. Just make sure you use a couple of layers of glue. I didn’t think what I used would hold, but I have been pleasantly surprised by the strength of gorilla glue epoxy. Look for the highest psi rated, clear epoxy glue you can find.

Squeeze the two sides of the epoxy glue into the plastic mixing plate that comes in the package. Thoroughly mix it together with the enclosed stick and immediately place it on the bell hanger rim, both inside and out. Do not wait long or it will begin to set and you’ll have to start over with new glue. Use the stick that comes with the glue to smear it around the bell hanger and up the sides. Wait the recommended time for it to cure. Once it is completely cured add a second layer around the plate and up the sides of the bell hanger. Again: wait the recommended time for each layer to cure.

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Look around your yard and find the spot you want to add a glass flower. Don’t place your glass flower over something hard like stone or concrete. I had one of my assembled flowers drop (the gray set above). It bounced off of the soil below it and wasn’t damaged. I just popped some of the old glue off and used a few more layers of glue to repair it. I put it right back up once the glue dried. If you use thicker glass and it falls onto the surrounding soil, it may not break as easily as a very thin piece would.

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As you can see the real flowers in this photo are from this spring (2014). I waited until the fall to recommend my methods. These instructions worked for me. The completed glass flowers I made this spring still look great and are still holding strong!

Once you find your spot: drive your rebar into the ground with a hammer or mallet like you see in the above photo. It needs to be fairly deep to support the weight of the flower and whatever wind hits it, but needs to come up close to the top of the pvc pipe so the pvc doesn’t bend and break from the weight. Put the long piece of pvc pipe on the ground next to the rebar and mark how tall you want the pipe to be. Cut your pipe to the length you measured. You don’t have to be exact since the bell clamp is adjustable. I recommend placing the cut side down although, it probably won’t really matter since the glass plate will cover that end.

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Take the assembled glass flower and place it and the attached pvc pipe over the rebar. Slide the flower up or down to make sure the glass and pvc is supported by the rebar. (The pvc does not need to fit tightly over the rebar. The rebar just serves as additional support for the pipe.) The pvc will probably be stamped. I just turned the printed area towards the back of the flowerbed.

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The outside part of the clamp opens up and can be adjusted without removing the entire back of the bell clamp. It has a u shaped area to support the screw. Hang the plate with the open area of the u shaped area up. This will allow the screw to be supported underneath by the outside of the clamp. Tighten the screw down with a screwdriver.

Using pvc pipe over rebar makes the flower quickly removable by sliding the whole assembly off of the rebar. Just grab the plate and pvc pipe together and lift it up and off of the rebar. When you have storms with high winds or hail and for when your winter dips below freezing (we don’t see much of that down here!) pull the whole assembly off the rebar and store it in a protected area. When it’s time to put it back outside just slide it back over the rebar. It also makes it easy to work on your flower if you need to do repairs. I don’t notice the pipe and I don’t recommend painting it because it would eventually peel.

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My flowers have made it from February to September. One needed repair but hasn’t had an issue since I used two layers of epoxy on it.

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Now you have the basic instructions for whatever removable glass art flowers you decide you’d like to see in your flower beds. I have totally enjoyed mine. I think the next few I make I’ll try some pretty china from the local thrift shop, just for variety.

If you use my instructions and decide to post your work, please link back to the instructions on my site. Thanks!

 

 

 

Short Cut Through The Hardening-Off Process

Oh, I love my milk jugs! I start my seeds in them. I root cuttings in them. I short cut the hardening-off process with them.

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Yes! That’s right you can now be lazy like me and get past the long and annoying process of getting plants into your garden. Hardening off plants is necessary but I hate it. It requires patience, planning and organization. I am not good at any of those. Moving a plant from indoor light to your outdoor location (especially in full sun) without having the plant sunburn and suffer from wind burn takes more effort than I enjoy using for a seedling: out in the shade, back in the house, in the shade, in the sun…moving trays of plants ad nauseum.

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Granted I don’t have acres of garden area to deal with, but I have enough plants hardening off at the same time that I was on the lookout for an easier way to do it.

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Enter the milk jugs. Luckily for me I have some major milk drinking kids (Okay, I admit it. I am, too) and I always have gallon jugs. The nice thing about milk jugs is they are semi-opaque. They keep the sun down to a reasonable level, keep the wind at bay and let the transplanted seedling establish itself. Just cut the base off and you’re good to go. You will need to raise the jugs to water.

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I am also using water bottles with some parchment paper or wax paper run inside it and vents cut around individual seedlings for a few days. The water bottles will only allow a small plant. You could probably use it on any nightshade family plant that starts off looking like a pepper seedling (including: tomatillo, peppers, husk cherry, garden huckleberry.) If we drank pop: I would also be using two liter bottles with the parchment/wax paper. I use what we have, therefore: I use milk jugs (and well rinsed out vinegar jugs when I get an empty.)

 

Run a stick next to your transplanted seedling to hold bottles in place. I’m only using water bottles because I don’t have thirty milk jugs hanging out to cover everything. Like I said: I use what I have. I’m certainly saving more jugs for next year!!! Go ahead and cut some vents in any clear container you are putting paper in. All of the covers will need to vent or you will cook the plants.

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Next: nestle the jug or bottle into the soil. If you live in a windy area like I do, run some chicken wire over your bed (flatten it out first.) The chicken wire and your stick you ran down the center of the bottles will hold the jugs and bottles in place. Do not put the caps back on. I also put some iron based natural snail bait down because I was getting holes on the plants overnight. Slugs and snails are sneaky!!!

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Don’t let them dry out, keep them watered daily until they establish. Leave the small ones on for several days, the jugs up to a week. You can then make a judgement call when you think they will make it without the cover. You are looking for things like: solid growth, no major wilting and generally healthy, happy seedlings. You can pop these on and off during the day/night for a few days before you are ready to remove them for good. This will get the plants past wind burn and sunburn. Look at what you are dealing with weather-wise and try to remove the covers permanently on a calm/cloudy/wet day or when you will experience lower temperatures. You could certainly use row cover to do the same thing, but I prefer the milk jugs (I’m now addicted! Good thing I love milk!)

 

I could deal with row cover (which really isn’t much different, but here are the cons:) Row cover falls apart quickly, gets full of debris, can blow off and into your neighbors yard with enough wind (the winds in Colorado would blow so hard the row cover would rip away from the landscape pins!) some seasons I can find it easily, other seasons it’s a huge search that results in serious frustration and a purchase online, lastly: I bleach most things I reuse between seasons to cut down on fungal spores. Alternatively: I can store a bunch of milk jugs in my garage every winter and use them for years! Quicker, easier, already on hand…the jugs have my vote!

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My peppers made the transition beautifully! I love shortcuts that work!

Since I’m enjoying my garden so much this year, I thought I’d throw in some random photos from this week:

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Chard down here is a perennial. These are green through winter.

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Corn on one foot centers.

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Tomatoes from the local nursery. I don’t grow tomatoes from seed because the summer is too hot to set fruit and the spring here is short.

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Tomato babies!!!

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Peas are close to harvest time.

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Beautiful radish!

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